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NOVEMBER 2019
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WEB ORDERS and
INQUIRIES call
DAILY 1 - 9 ET

1-800-627-8223
or email us

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Williamsburg
SHOWROOM HOURS

November 2019

Saturday 11 - 3
And other weekdays
by appointment


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(757) 565-7424
1-800-627-8223

 Art of Dr. Seuss
 Disney Fine Art Prints
 Greenwich Workshop Artists
 Harry Potter Book Prints
 Charles Schulz (Peanuts)
 Tom Everhart (Snoopy)
 Chuck Jones (Grinch Prints)
 Vintage Posters (War+Film)
 Mystic Seaport Artwork
 Sat. Evening Post Covers
 Bethany Lowe Plushes
 Richard Masloski Bronzes
 Mark Hopkins Bronzes
 Mill Pond Press Prints
 
 Showcasing:
 VINTAGE POSTERS
      Vintage Posters Webportfolio
 CLASSIC MAGAZINE COVERS
      Classic Magazine Covers Webportfolio
 SATIRE MAGAZINE LITHOGRAPHS
      Satire Magazine Lithographs Webportfolio
 IMAGES OF WILLIAMSBURG
      Images of Williamsburg Webportfolio
 MUSEUM MASTERWORKS
      Museum Masterworks Webportfolio
 MARITIME ART
      Maritime Art Webportfolio
Rally ‘round the flag!
Before television, movies, and mass-circulation magazines arrived, the printed poster was the most effective and cost-efficient way to communicate to large audiences. Borrowing a practice from European advertisers and governments, the American government during both world wars effectively used posters to recruit a militia, rally citizens, and raise money for war efforts.


Charles Dana Gibson (creator of the “Gibson Girl”) was recruited in 1917 to head a federal Division of Pictorial Publicity. Gibson enlisted his fellow illustrators to contribute artwork for posters (N.C. Wyeth, Joseph Pennell, Howard Chandler Christy, J.C. Leyendecker, Clarence Coles Phillips, and James Montgomery Flagg, as starters). All told, more than 700 poster designs were created by the Division for World War I, with Flagg producing 46 himself including the famous “I Want You” image in which he used his own likeness for Uncle Sam. Reprints at the time totaled more than five million copies of this one design.
During World War II poster creation was resumed. Posters urged Americans to work harder to produce more war materiel, save scrap metal, plant “Victory Gardens,” and to buy bonds. Patriotism was the topic. War bond posters helped to raise $135 billion for the war effort. Norman Rockwell, known for his “Saturday Evening Post” covers, contributed four posters in 1943 depicting the “Four Freedoms.” A tour featuring these four images (and often Rockwell himself) attracted over 1.2 million people and raised $133 million toward the war effort through public purchases of government bonds. All told, four million sets of these posters were printed.
Despite the unbelievable number of wartime posters produced during the two wars, few remain in the Twenty-first Century. The poster collection of The Art-cade is entirely vintage posters (not reproductions) and can be classified “very good” to “near-mint” condition. Our collection has been selected using but one standard: that the images portrayed on the posters be from among the finest created by America’s best known illustrators.
 
   


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